A Comprehensive History of Computers [Infographic]

historyofcomputers
Lets sit back and think about what life was like before computers were everywhere. You actually had to send letters via the postal service, go to stores to buy things, and actually visit Uncle Larry at his house instead of at the prison where he is serving time for a hard drive full of illegal images. Any way, even though a mostly computerless world wasn't that long ago it really is hard to explain to some of the younger generation what a pain it really was. So in honor of the great technology we use everyday I present to you 'Computers - A Chronological Timeline'. Enjoy!

Lets sit back and think about what life was like before computers were everywhere. You actually had to send letters via the postal service, go to stores to buy things, and actually visit Uncle Larry at his house instead of at the prison where he is serving time for a hard drive full of illegal images. Any way, even though a mostly computerless world wasn’t that long ago it really is hard to explain to some of the younger generation what a pain it really was. So in honor of the great technology we use everyday I present to you ‘Computers – A Chronological Timeline’. Enjoy!

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Comments (22)

  1. R2E Micral Tuesday - 15 / 02 / 2011 Reply
    Missing: the Micral (considered as the first personal computer) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micral
  2. Camille Penny Tuesday - 15 / 02 / 2011 Reply
    Thank you for including Amiga systems in the list! They seem to get ignored fairly often in things like this, and it breaks my heart. I grew up on them - a 3000 saw me through high school. I've never been as fond of a system as I was of the Amiga.
  3. Tony C. Wednesday - 16 / 02 / 2011 Reply
    Good list, but you forgot the Atari ST...released the same time as the Amiga. It was a huge seller in the music industry (it had built-in MIDI ports), and was also big in Germany. It sold pretty well in the US, too.
  4. Madriles Tuesday - 22 / 02 / 2011 Reply
    April 1982. Sinclair Zx Spectrum. Early 80´s most popular computer in Europe. Interesting list in any case.
  5. Tim Perdue Tuesday - 22 / 02 / 2011 Reply
    Hey Andy - this is really impressive and I am sure it was a lot of work. We have seen the history of computers before but your format is really perfect for this. My first computer was a Comadore 64. Thanks for putting this together.
    • Andy Crofford Tuesday - 22 / 02 / 2011 Reply
      Hey Tim, thanks a lot for the comment it is greatly appreciated. I am glad you liked it.
  6. PetersOpinion Wednesday - 23 / 02 / 2011 Reply
    Really a great overview. One remark. I tried to use the provided code to share the Infographic 600px wide, but it's not working for me.
    • Andy Crofford Wednesday - 23 / 02 / 2011 Reply
      Peter, Thanks for letting me know. It should be fixed now. Take care.
  7. Ratn Wednesday - 23 / 02 / 2011 Reply
    Awesome .Thanks for such a great information .I loved it
  8. Amy Sunday - 27 / 02 / 2011 Reply
    Can we purchase a print of this??
  9. mormon.org Tuesday - 01 / 03 / 2011 Reply
    Took me awhile to see all the comments, but prefer enjoyed the article. It became very useful to me and read to all the commenters at this point! It's always nice unsuitable for your needs not only be smart, but also engaged! I'm sure you experienced fun writing this content.
  10. Philsan Wednesday - 02 / 03 / 2011 Reply
    Near Atari 400 e 800 computers, it should be written that those computer had outstanding (for 1979) graphics and sound capabilities (128 colors, sprites, 4 audio channels). "Gaming abilities" is a bit reductive. Thank you.
  11. Kanaka Varanasi Wednesday - 02 / 03 / 2011 Reply
    Wow ! great work. Still there is a lot way for computers to grow. Thanks
  12. juan Monday - 07 / 03 / 2011 Reply
    hi sirs we want to use this infographc into our digital publication but don't find a contact email to make the request please can you help us thanks in advance
    • Andy Crofford Tuesday - 08 / 03 / 2011 Reply
      Hi Juan, you are welcome to use the infographic. The code is provided for you at the bottom of the image. Please let me know if you have anymore questions.
  13. Mirko Saturday - 02 / 04 / 2011 Reply
    Great work ! But... AGC Apollo Guidance Computer - Block I (first version) was born and operative in 1964; AGC Block II (second version) one year later and was fully operative. In 1968 AGC flown in space for its first time. Regards
  14. Tod Ziegenfuss Saturday - 16 / 04 / 2011 Reply
    I don’t even know how I ended up here, but I thought this post was good. I do not know who you are but you are going to a famous blogger if you aren't already ;) Cheers!
  15. Nicole Monday - 25 / 04 / 2011 Reply
    And no mention of the Olivetti Programma 101. The first programmable calculator.
  16. Garth Bock Thursday - 26 / 05 / 2011 Reply
    No mention of Dell, Gateway, or the Northgate ? A good breakout version of this would be the history of communications starting with Arpanet, and mentioning Token Ring, fiber, etc....
  17. Janie Wait Thursday - 21 / 07 / 2011 Reply
    I was asked to put together a legacy data/systems history poster last year for the ARMA International conference. I broke my information into several categories - hardware, software, and wireless. I included radiography, gaming, business machines etc. We matched up on many innovations and I thought your readership might enjoy what I developed and I would appreciate your comments as well. It is a 11X17 double sided PDF available for free download at http://intermountainrecords.com/Documents/Presentations/LEGACY%20POSTER.pdf. It is much harder to include every technological innovation in an article like yours than people could imagine. From someone who also spent months researching this topic, great job!!
  18. shovan Sunday - 21 / 08 / 2011 Reply
    Thanks a lot for providing such a good accumalation of information about the history of computers. Great.
  19. IT Courses Tuesday - 23 / 08 / 2011 Reply
    I guess we should all thank the innovator who invented the computer and those who worked on making it smaller and more portable. Imagine having to lug around huge pieces of equipment to work!

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