Web Browser Shuffle: How User’s Preferences have Changed Over the Years [Infographic]

Web Browser Shuffle Infographic
It doesn't seem like that long ago when Netscape Navigator was my browser of choice and I thought you couldn't get any better than a resolution of 1024x768. Google Chrome is now my preferred Web Browser and 1680x1050 is my current resolution. It will be interesting to see what we are using 10 or 20 years from now.

It doesn’t seem like that long ago when Netscape Navigator was my browser of choice and I thought you couldn’t get any better than a resolution of 1024×768. Google Chrome is now my preferred Web Browser and 1680×1050 is my current resolution. It will be interesting to see what we are using 10 or 20 years from now.

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600 pixels wide version

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Comments (17)

  1. Quimperois Friday - 12 / 11 / 2010 Reply
    Hi, 2003 Internet Explorer 86.50% 2003 Netscape 86.50% Processor bug ?
  2. Cai Sunday - 14 / 11 / 2010 Reply
    Netscape & Opera are wrong way round in the browser discriptions.. IE and Netscape stats for 2006 too...just to let you know ;)
  3. Jeroen Onstenk Monday - 15 / 11 / 2010 Reply
    Great graphic! But unfortunately I see some errors and mistakes. Netscape browser usage Netscape Opera symbology 640x480 screen resolution in 2001
    • Andy Crofford Monday - 15 / 11 / 2010 Reply
      Thank you for bringing these to our attention, we appreciate it.
  4. jani Monday - 15 / 11 / 2010 Reply
    Nice inforgraphics! There are a few mistakes (as pointed out above), but otherwise this is a very useful piece of information. Good luck on v2!
  5. wes Tuesday - 16 / 11 / 2010 Reply
    I hate being negative, but this is a terrible way to use pie charts and your methodologies are questionable. Reading dates backwards is very unintuitive for one thing. Not only are these graphs hard to follow, but the numbers are completely fucking wrong for a few. Like the Netscape percentages. Did you not bother to check those before publishing this? There are a zillion ways you could show this data and I hate to say it, but you pretty much choose the more horrible of the bunch.
    • Andy Crofford Tuesday - 16 / 11 / 2010 Reply
      Wes, I don't think you were being negative. We appreciate the constructive feedback.
  6. Jeffrey Bennett Tuesday - 16 / 11 / 2010 Reply
    As a photographer and website developer, I must say that I'm *extremely* glad to learn that people are moving away from Internet Explorer. Thank you for sharing this! :)
    • Andy Crofford Tuesday - 16 / 11 / 2010 Reply
      I agree. I would probably enjoy coding a site into CSS/HTML A LOT more if it wasn't for IE.
  7. dave Tuesday - 16 / 11 / 2010 Reply
    OMG i cant believe we use to live in a world of 800 x 600 browser resolution, where 1024 was considered high...thank God we have evolved.
    • Andy Crofford Tuesday - 16 / 11 / 2010 Reply
      Yes, it seems like such a long time ago. Now I find 1024x768 to be unusable.
  8. Stuart Holmes Tuesday - 23 / 11 / 2010 Reply
    Stats based on w3schools are not a good base for this case study as the 'users' will be web designers, developers and students so will not paint an accurate picture of web users as a whole. I quote from the site "W3Schools is a website for people with an interest for web technologies. These people are more interested in using alternative browsers than the average user. The average user tends to use Internet Explorer, since it comes preinstalled with Windows. Most do not seek out other browsers. These facts indicate that the browser figures above are not 100% realistic. Other web sites have statistics showing that Internet Explorer is used by at least 80% of the users." - source: http://w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp
    • Andy Crofford Tuesday - 23 / 11 / 2010 Reply
      Yes, but we are still able to see a trend which I believe also represents a wider user base.
      • Dustin Saturday - 11 / 12 / 2010 Reply
        I don't believe so. It's a trend of the users you sampled (in this case, mostly designers/devs). Effectively, you've looked at a user base thats already swayed in one direction. Designers and developers usually keep on top of tech. So the majority of them would have the better/larger screens, using the best browsers of the time period. To get a more accurate result, you would have to pull data from a more neutral website, Google for example. Google is used by both nerds and average users alike, so their user stats shouldn't have a predisposition towards any group.
  9. Brett Widmann Friday - 25 / 02 / 2011 Reply
    This was an interesting article! It was a fun way to display the info as well.
  10. chuck Thursday - 28 / 04 / 2011 Reply
    Most people will use that which is the easiest. I myself try a bit of them all. But mainly now stick with IE.

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